Classroom grace in small things

Today I reflected on not having blogged in a while and what keeps me inspired lately. Here, in no particular order, is a list of things I’m loving right now:

Teaching art. When I get to look at a piece of art for a long time with my students and just talk about it. They have such interesting and unexpected ideas.

Teaching reading and writing. I’ve been concentrating lately on disciplinary literacy – teaching reading in math, science, and social as intentionally as I teach it it language arts.

Remembering what it’s like to be an author. I decided instead of writing a throw away piece like I often do when modelling for students that I would write a piece I was actually working on. I think it might actually be something and that’s a fun place to be in.

Watching my students run the classroom routines. Seriously, this time of year the classroom just thrums like a well-oiled machine.

New books.

Student portfolios and reflecting on just how much they have learned.

Comfy shoes stashed behind my desk (and the student who comments how she likes them so much better than the other ones I had on – I confessed they were a bit pinchy.)

Multiliteracies, Social Media, and the Second-Language Classroom

I initially struggled with how to present my learning in this course; how can a non-linear understanding of course material be wrangled into a linear presentation? My final a-ha moment of ETEC540 is that I should present the information as I understand it and not necessarily in a linear fashion, but still put it in a format that makes sense to meet the grading criteria (insert emoji face here). For that reason, I have chosen a hypertext environment to present, knowing that my reader will be pulled off in many directions while performing the webquest that is my final multi-media project.

This project explores the impact of social media environments on literacy development among second-language students. Immersion students’ learning tasks are double as they progress: learning a second language and learning to read and write. How can teachers take advantage of social media environments to speed up vocabulary acquisition and support literacy?

“Weblogs, wikis, trackback, podcasting, videoblogs, and social networking tools like MySpace and Facebook to give rise to an abbreviation mocking their prevalence: YASN (Yet Another Social Network)” (Dobson, p19). While students may be familiar with the tools for socialization, they also provide a powerful opportunity for developing literacy skills when leveraged in the classroom.

“WebQuests favor cooperative and project-based learning, as they are used for interaction and problem solving. As learners work in pairs or in teams, “they need skills to plan, organize, negotiate, make their points, and arrive at a consensus about issues such as what tasks to perform” (Aydin, 769)

This is your invitation to adventure! The Webquest to improve student literacy begins here!

Quest 1: Audience and interactivity

Quest 2: Oral story vs written story and collaboration of writers

Quest 3: Vocabulary for building literacy

Don’t forget to come back and leave a comment!

Delicious feed with links to above social media platforms. This course has pushed my thinking, and in deciding how to represent my learning, I decided to fully leap into some of the digital technologies that I may have been reluctant to embrace to this point and found that my own learning improved by leaps and bounds.

This class gave me the theory behind some of the practices already in my classroom and introduced some new ideas. Technology is a tool for learning that changes the way learners interact with text. I realized that the digital tools provided in classrooms are not an accommodation to meeting the learning needs of a few but tools to allow all students to express understanding.

References:

Aydin, S. (2016) WebQuests as language-learning tools. Computer Assisted Language Learning Vol. 29 , Iss. 4,2016. Retreived from http://www-tandfonline-com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/doi/pdf/10.1080/09588221.2015.1061019?needAccess=true

Calhoun, E. (1999) Teaching Beginning Reading and Writing with the Picture Word Inductive Model. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/199025/chapters/Describing-the-Picture-Word-Inductive-Model.aspx

Dobson, T. Willinsky, J. (2009) Digital Literacy. https://pkp.sfu.ca/files/Digital%20Literacy.pdf

Durante, C. B. (2016). Adapting nonverbal coding theory to mobile mediated communication: An analysis of emoji and other digital nonverbals (Order No. 10120382). Available from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (1805884511). Retrieved from http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/docview/1805884511?accountid=14656

Mills, K. (2010). The multiliteracies classroom Multilingual Matters.

Schrock, K.  (2016) Resources to support the SAMR Model. http://www.schrockguide.net/samr.html

Verga, L. (2013) How relevant is social interaction in second language learning? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3759854/

Ong, Walter J. (2003). Orality and Literacy. Routledge. Retrieved November 2016, from http://www.myilibrary.com?ID=1960

Digital Literacy, Multiliteracies, and Classroom Accommodations

Forgive my cross-posting. This was originally written for a class and I’m reposting here to share with those educators I frequently interact with. Thoughts welcome.

apples

When reference is made to classroom accommodations, there is often expressions of distress — concern that if the student just can’t cut it in the classroom with the “normal” expectations then there will be adjustment in the tools available or to the curricular expectations. But, if, as Cazden posits, the fundamental purpose of education is “to ensure that all students benefit from learning in ways that allow them to participate fully in public, community and economic life”, then providing tools for students to do the job is not an accommodation to meet their learning needs — it is part of the job of teaching. Digital tools for teaching and learning are simply the latest iteration in a long line of technological advances. When discussing a return to the “good old days of teaching and learning” the reference is not to a return to wax tablets nor to a return to one-room school houses with ink-wells and chalk and slate. To what, then, is the return to basics advocating?

Adult learners have the experience with tools to decide which tools are necessary for which jobs. While occasionally handwritten work may trump digital tools (when the writer experiences difficulty wrangling a sentence into the desired form, when the learner feels like the task is not engaging or that they are falling asleep during reading, when the learner desires a bodily-kinesthetic connection between concepts), adult learners, workers, citizens, rely heavily on digital tools for work and play. Lists are made on a phone. Reading is done from digital textbooks where the reader can highlight, annotate, and export notes, which are then turned into written responses in longer form using digital mind mapping tools to plan and google docs to write, wordpress to publish, share and interact.

Digital voice assistant-controlled software, including Siri and Google, are frequently used to interact with devices. Of iPhone users, 98% have used Siri to interact with their phones, although a smaller percentage use a digital assistant regularly. “Hey Siri!” or “Ok, Google” have already become common vernacular among young learners. Blog posts, essays, letters, and emails can be dictated via talk-to-text tools that are fast approaching the accuracy of humans, although there remains reluctance to engage in voice engagement with digital tools while in public. Yet classroom educators continue to insist that if a child cannot write with pencil and paper with flawless spelling and grammar with only the support of a photocopied graphic organizer as an outline tool and a ten-pound-brick of a dictionary that they cannot write and the hand wringing begins.

As stakeholders in education, let’s  let go of the double standard and denying tools to learners until after they have mastered “the basics”. Luke and Luke assert that competence with one domain is often inappropriately reconstrued as incompetence with print-based literacies and “that the crises of print literacy and their preferred ameliorative social strategies are being used as a nodal point in public discourse both to delay and sublimate the emergence of new educational paradigms around multiliteracies, around new blended forms of textual and symbolic practice and affiliated modes of identity and social relations” (Luke and Luke p. 96). The paradigm shift will happen with us or without us.

As in the 70s with the introduction of calculators into calculus classrooms there was considerable concern that the new technology would suppress learners’ abilities to master the basics. Calculators are now standard tools in the classroom and there is an app that can easily read and solve handwritten complex equations. The work of classrooms is not to deny learners access to tools that facilitate learning and working with information but to teach them “to be information literate, […] to recognize when information is needed, and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information” (ALA, p18)

References:

American Library Association (ALA) (1989). Presidential Committee on Information Literacy. Final Report. Chicago, IL: American Library Association.

Cazden, C. Cope, B. Fairclough, N. Gee, J. et. al. (1996) A pedagogy of multiliteracies: Designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review. http://newarcproject.pbworks.com/f/Pedagogy%2Bof%2BMultiliteracies_New%2BLondon%2BGroup.pdf

Clark, B. (2016). Microsoft’s Speech Recognition is now just as accurate as humans. The Next Web. http://thenextweb.com/microsoft/2016/10/18/microsofts-speech-recognition-is-now-just-as-accurate-as-humans/

Dobson, T. & WIlinsky, J. Digital Literacy.

Leswig, K. (2016) Here’s why people don’t use Siri regularly, even though 98% of iPhone users have tried it. Business Insider. http://www.businessinsider.com/98-of-iphone-users-have-tried-siri-but-most-dont-use-it-regularly-2016-6

Luke, A., & Luke, C. (2001). Journal of early childhood literacy: Adolescence Lost/Childhood regained: On early intervention and the emergence of the techno-subject. Sage Publications.

Author study: William Joyce

This one got buried in my drafts folder and I’m pulling it out to share since it was such a happy bit of “this never happens” that happened for my students when I stuck my neck out and made a “the worst thing that can happen is he says no” request of a writer I have long admired. 
Our author visit with William Joyce came about quite by accident. I wish I could say I planned it.

As I often do with students, I watched a wordless short film, The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr Morris Lessmore, as a vocabulary building activity. We shook loose juicy vocabulary in a PWIM-type activity.

The following week I was at a dental appointment and had an extra minute after getting a gleaming smile but before I had to pick up the darling children, so I swung into Chapters where Ollie’s Odyssey jumped off the shelves and into my hands. I read it myself and adored it and decided to share some of it with students as a book sell.

That night I tweeted to William Joyce that I was  loving his book and would he be interested in Skyping with my class. To my enormous surprise, he said yes!

Prepping students for the meeting was a wonderful experience in pushing them to ask more open questions as we sought to ask questions that would make him talk more. “We don’t want him to just answer yes or no! That’s boring!”

Other books we read included:

The Mischevians

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr Morris Lessmore

Billy’s Booger

The Numberlys

The Guardians of Childhood

Thanks to my amazing team of teachers the Skype chat was an enormous success! Would you believe I had a tooth extracted days before the visit and my face swelled to the size of a pumpkin… so I missed it! But my students were incredibly excited to share when I got back.

This goes to show for me what a powerful experience digital tools can help create for our learners when we bust the “silos” of solo classrooms!