A year without worksheets

I’m not a big resolution maker, but I was surfing around Facebook this morning where I spied a really cute back-to-school new year package of worksheets. “So cute!” I thought, zooming in for a closer look. “And free! Great!” Then I took a close look at the work the worksheet actually asked of students, and… “ugh.”

Just because it’s cute doesn’t make it engaging. Sure, it fills time… print out, pass out, go back to enjoying that coffee while the kiddles work. But what if there were something better?

…and, here’s a poorly kept secret, there is…

Let this be the year of no more mindless worksheets. Instead, try:

1. Digital Technology

If your first foray into using digital tools in the classroom is to substitute a technology tool for a worksheet then congratulations! You just waded into the SAMR pool! Replace a worksheet with an app or a G-suite fillable worksheet. Great! Step one done! Keep going until you’re swimming in the SAMR deep end! Invite a guest speaker via Skype. Play mystery Skype. Have students blog or podcast. Use a padlet! How about all-student response systems like Plickers or socrative?

 2. Visual journals

Usually if it’s a worksheet it can be adapted to a visual journal page. Yay! That’s step one! Now… go beyond adapting worksheets by trying sketch noting, or visible thinking routines like see, connect, wonder, concept webbing, or a visual journaling technique.

3. The everything notebook

Write a journal entry. I get it… a blank page can be intimidating. But it can also be creatively freeing. Instead of writing on a photocopied worksheet, let students work in their journal or in their everything notebook. If they need a prompt, I still think it’s not a horrible idea to photocopy a prompt or a cloze paragraph starter. But photocopied pages of blank lines? That’s called a notebook.

4. The everything binder

Looking for a way to move beyond a storage device for worksheets? Try interactive journal pages and personal practice. At first glance, an interactive journal page looks a lot like a worksheet. Don’t be fooled. The difference is that students come back to the interactive journals later for practice while they complete a worksheet and never look at it again. The interactive journal pages I have made so far have the “I can” statement at the top in student-friendly language and then there are 4-5 questions that demonstrate that the student, in fact, can. These often involve some kind of flap so that during personal practice time students can use the pages to review the “I can” skill. Personal practice time is only about 5 minutes each day reserved for review of skills, but I know that each child is reviewing skills relevant to them and I can work during this time in math conferencing.

5. Really think about why it’s being written instead of discussed.

Think about whether or not it really needs to be written down. A well-planned discussion might be a better use of student time than the time spent filling in a worksheet, especially for our second-language learners! They NEED more talk time!

I’d love to hear other ideas! How are you making the photocopier obsolete?

The everything notebook for students

My everything notebook took a long time to perfect for my personal needs, but it’s something I’ve adapted for my classroom needs. The everything notebook is just that: a place to record everything. Scholar and writer @raulpacheco has written about his everything notebook here. I would say, draw from example and tailor for your needs. When I first heard of bullet journaling I thought it would be a brilliant idea to try with students but it didn’t work for me at all.

The reason my everything notebook works for me is I know I have one place to keep everything: reading journal, writing, journaling… I used to be the teacher with buckets of notebooks I mostly kept out of student hands because I didn’t like them to get beaten up in desks. Upon reflection, I think students benefit from being in charge of their own notebooks. I always provide some instruction on organizational skills: how to organize a page and how to track work inside a notebook, but ultimately the work has to belong to students and I have seen them become proud owners of what’s inside their notebooks when they are in charge.

The student version looks like this:

Personalized cover: I wanted to buy hard cover notebooks but those are EXPENSIVE! And given that most students go through a couple of notebooks in my classroom, we opted for less expensive but still personalized covers stapled over the store bought cover.

Front: the first pages are reserved for an index. Each page gets a month and each line is numbered by date. As we work through the notebook, students are asked to go back to the index and make a running record of the work we complete.

Inside cover: I printed out a copy of our reading/ writing routines and asked students to glue it here.

Colour coding: I asked students to highlight the top corner of the page: blue for French green for English. As we move through the year I have found that we don’t really need this; we divided our day instead. If it’s before lunch work is in French. After lunch: literacy work is English.

Write: write every single day! Writing is often choice work for my students. I offer a topic most days with front loaded vocabulary and sentence starters, but students are always welcome to write something else, too.

Respond: I try to respond to written work as fast as possible (my goal is 24h but that’s not always possible) and to conference with my writers while they are working and feed forward can make a difference.

Final pages: Students create TBR (to be read) and TBW (to be written) lists. This is to support them in those moments when they want to write but are just not sure what to write.

Personal dictionary: I have found a personal dictionary effective in support of writing routines. Students are expected to add new words to it and refer frequently to it. It is separate from the everything notebook for now.

The everything notebook goes into the book box, which I’ll post about later. As always, I’d love to hear other solutions for organizing in the classroom. 


The value of off

In my life I make a lot of digital things: blogs, short films, Web sites, podcasts, and ebooks, oh my… There are bits of ideas scattered all over the Internet. I LOVE reading and writing about teaching and learning, but I occasionally need a break from screens to make a thing I can hold in my hands. 

It’s so easy in classroom work to be pulled madly off in all directions; 24 people are all priority one and networks of support spring up… and every one of them a meeting to attend.

It’s easy to get caught up in the whirlwind of busy.

It’s so easy to forget to breathe when everything on the “to do” list is “urgent”.

But an interesting thing happens when we let off the gas for a minute…

Sometimes time off rolls around and stillness has the opportunity to sneak in. And in the stillness comes creativity and fresh ideas. Like a sponge wrung fully dry that must come to a full stop in order to draw in as much liquid as possible in the next squeeze.

Athletes know that intense training sessions are followed by nourishing the muscles and resting for repair. (I do like flogging a tired triathlon metaphor…) Remember to rest, teacher friends. Do more of what calls your soul. 

Draw, write, read, run, play.

Enjoy the last few days of light getting shorter! 

The tired time of year…

December really is long, and dark, and cold, isn’t it? So, a personal recipe to push back on the tired…

1. Drink coffee. Bring one for a friend.

2. Immerse yourself in real things: crayons, knitting needles, books. Back away from digital things for awhile…

3. Engage in meaningful professional conversations with amazing educators.

4. Hug.

5. Put on something nicer than your mood feels. Your mood’ll catch up.

6. Run. 

7. Play a song you love really loudly and sing along unapologetically. Enthusiastically wave to anyone who catches you. “The best way to spread Christmas cheer is to sing loud and clear for all to hear.”

8. Sound a barbaric yawp.

9. Find humour.

It’s the tired time of year, teacher friends, take time for yourself and the things that make the world a little brighter.

I’d love to know know where you put your focus that makes the world shiny when it feels tired.

Student feedback and a thought about being an “expert” with lots to learn

I’ve been reluctant to write lately. I think this is partly due to being mid-masters degree and knowing what academic writing looks like and this blog being a weird hybrid between academic and “hey, friends, here’s what works for me…”

I write partly as a reminder to myself of what works, partly to share and seek feedback from my peers, and partly just because I think writing is fun. 

Here’s a feedback strategy I have started to use for student writing, which is the latest iteration of my many varied methods of providing students with feedback over the years. I find this one suits my needs right now and is accessible for my young learners.

Highlighter & sticky notes

I use bright sticky notes with a highlighter in a matching colour. The goal of this colour-coded feedback is for students to be able to identify the error and how to fix it. For the moment, I am trying to stick with two stars and a wish, both of which should be specific. The sticky note feedback is a new iteration of my old colour-code system where I just marked with five highlighters the types of errors students were making without providing much for written feedback.

Use pencil

I have a love affair with coloured pens and many teachers I know do. I always sort of figured I wanted my words to pop out for students so they would find them, but the more I reflect on the purpose of feedback, the more I think pencil makes sense. Students generally want work that looks tidy and reflects their best work. When parents come in and thumb through their notebooks the thing that stands out should be the student’s work NOT the teacher’s. Those with anxiety or a bit of perfectionist tendencies can remove it and have “perfect” final work. My fear was always that students would erase it… “But it won’t show parents what I told the kids…” What is the purpose of the feedback? It’s for students not for parents.

Iris and student process portfolios

As I mark, I keep student profiles open to make notes. This helps with providing students feedback, meeting with parents, and providing next steps on summative reporting like report cards. If the stickies do get lost I have a copy of the next steps for each student, although I don’t take the time to copy everything into the portfolio.

Mark it twice

I have been trying to provide students with this actionable feedback and then allowing them time to respond to it and improve their work. This often leads to a mini-lesson but sometimes the written feedback is enough.

I certainly don’t have it figured all the way out and I’m feeling a bit lax for not providing citations for my writing here… it’s just a personal reflection and nothing more.

Happy teaching, colleagues. I’d love to have your ideas for feedback,too!

A Good Fit Book

“How do you know if a book is a good fit for you?” I honestly asked the question to my class and quickly lead a conversation about how a good-fit book was a lot like finding a good fit shoe. The “five finger” rule was discussed. Then off to the library we went.

And some students still had a hard time picking a book. So I thought some more about how to pick a book. After all, finding a good-fit book is a lot like finding a good fit shoe, but you don’t wear the same shoe to run a 5k as you wear to your best friend’s wedding.

Students loved this book by Oliver Jeffers!


Browse

For many of us there is a visceral pleasure in walking book stacks and browsing titles. Being the first to discover a new book with the still uncracked spine or stumbling accross a well-worn tome with someone else’s annotations in the margins. But for many kids, the library or book store is too full of books and overwhelming or a place where magic simply doesn’t live. So we need to support them as a community of readers.

 

Book sell

In my classroom, when students read something good they are encouraged to share. We save a few minutes each week for students to read aloud to one another and tell why the LOVED a book. Not for marks. Just because books are awesome and need to be shared. I also stock the classroom library with books from the school library, carefully curating for my students so that there is a little of everything. My goal in the coming months is for my students to take over the job of curating. How should we organize the library? What kinds of books should we include? What do the children in the stories look like? Where are the writers of the stories from? Why should we care?

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This project involves students by having them create an “art card” book review for a book they loved. They create a small work of art to represent the book they read and then an audio clip where they review the book. The art card becomes a trigger for the audio file by using the Aurasma app.

Ask a friend

In addition to creating formal time for sharing books (we do a breakfast book chat 4 times a year where students eat breakfast together and talk books), I think there needs to be a network of readers built into our classrooms. We come to know one another’s tastes in books and know that Kevin enjoys funny books while Jane loves sweet stories about animals. If you’re looking for your next great read ask a friend.

Keep a list

My students keep a book box and I’m asking them to keep a TBR (to be read) list at the back of their Daily 5 journals. It’s a nice way for them to keep track of what they are reading and what to read next.

Find a topic, character, or author you love

When students are looking for something to read I often send them of in the direction of an author they already know and love or to check out a section of books on a related topic.

Try a new genre

Take a risk! You might find something you love! I always knew I loved wordless books but never considered reading graphic novels. Until I did. I’ll never look back.

Read to learn

Some kids really just don’t get into fiction. And that’s ok. If a made up story isn’t turning their crank how about a good non-fiction or a historical fiction. There are so many to choose from. So what are you wondering right now?

Read for fun

We have to let students read because it’s fun and interesting and not because they will be required to report on their reading.

Use technology and social bookmarking

Social platforms allow for interaction about reading. This is to be used carefully with young readers but they can easily use a classroom “tweet” wall where they share a thought through a sticky note or a quick book talk on a closed website.

Story many ways
I have had more than one student come to me in tears because their ability to decode text did not match their ability to understand story. Wanting to read a novel but unable to access the text they felt helpless. So we tried many ways, finally settling on reading the book with the support of the audio book. This can be an especially powerful tool for our immersion students who benefit from hearing words at the same time as they see them.

Book shop

Pick a book off the shelf. Turn it over in your hands. Read the back cover and the about the author. Read a sample chapter. Give it a chance, but know that…

It’s ok to quit a book
Please don’t plod through a book you hate. If the book jumps the shark or just plain peters out it’s ok to walk away.

A word about the five finger rule

I respect this general guideline, but that’s all it is. In the end students need to understand that the goal of reading is to understand the text and I’m not sure many of them understand that, haltingly decoding their way through a book that exceeds their reading ability and confidently declaring their level but unable to talk about their book! It’s not about the number! Please let kids love books. When they stumble through it they enjoy it in a different way than when they read it for the fourth time fluently and with expression. I am living proof that I can read a book with fluency and expression and have no idea what the book says… hello bedtime stories. Sometimes I love them. Sometimes I have no idea what I just read… take chances. Read way above your level. But also take chances and read below your level and find a book that speaks to you in another way.

Happy reading everyone! I’d love to hear your ideas on how to hook kids on books!

Classroom grace in small things

Today I reflected on not having blogged in a while and what keeps me inspired lately. Here, in no particular order, is a list of things I’m loving right now:

Teaching art. When I get to look at a piece of art for a long time with my students and just talk about it. They have such interesting and unexpected ideas.

Teaching reading and writing. I’ve been concentrating lately on disciplinary literacy – teaching reading in math, science, and social as intentionally as I teach it it language arts.

Remembering what it’s like to be an author. I decided instead of writing a throw away piece like I often do when modelling for students that I would write a piece I was actually working on. I think it might actually be something and that’s a fun place to be in.

Watching my students run the classroom routines. Seriously, this time of year the classroom just thrums like a well-oiled machine.

New books.

Student portfolios and reflecting on just how much they have learned.

Comfy shoes stashed behind my desk (and the student who comments how she likes them so much better than the other ones I had on – I confessed they were a bit pinchy.)