April is poetry month

How to Eat a Poem by Eve Merriam:


Poetry matters. Jason Reynolds talks here about how poetry can be a gateway for non-readers, those who don’t get lost in the pages, and I finally connected to why teaching poetry might be important.

Jason Reynold’s Long Way Down is a wonderful read for middle-years students. It’s a quick read with a powerful message. I won’t share it with my Grade Threes but it was a good read for me and I think the author has an important point: the text in the book is not dense and I can see how it would be a “gateway book” for reading.

On to the books I will be using this year:

The breathtaking book, This is a Poem that Heals Fish, is about a little boy seeking the definition of a poem who finds that poetry is everywhere if we only bother to look for it.

The final pages caught me by surprise in their simple beauty. Finally, I found a poem I LOVE! And it’s available in its original French, which is a HUGE plus for immersion teachers who work so hard for students to experience original texts in the author’s first language.

While writing, I’m planning to have students focus on colour through mentor texts. The following books are beautiful, poetic inspiration.

The Black Book of Colors is full of descriptive language that invites students to explore colours with all of their senses. Each page has a black-on-black illustration that invites children to explore through senses other than seeing.

Green spends an entire book exploring every shade of green and I’ll invite students to choose a colour using a paint swatch and to turn it into a colour poem. The author, Laura Vaccaro Seeger, has also recently published Blue, which I’m excited to add to my collection.


An experiential exploration that makes the quotidian magical: What Color is the Wind?

Blue isn’t typically a happy colour. But I feel happy when I wear it. So my blue is happy, too. What colour is happy for you?

Poetry is small marvels; The Heart and the Bottle is a breathtaking book about a girl who protects her heart from hurt by bottling it up. Students might use the story to write about the small and large marvels in the world that touch their hearts.

The Important Book seeks what is essential:

Sometimes when students are stuck on finding their own words, it helps to have words in front of them that can be pushed around and rearranged without a lot of effort. I’m going to try magnetic poetry. I purchased a couple of sheets of magnet that can run through a printer and found some words here.

Wordle Can be used to create word clouds, a beautiful representation of descriptive language or try a collaborative word cloud with the whole class using Mentimeter

Finally, Celebrate Poem in Your Pocket Day is at the end of the month. I look forward to sharing beautiful language with students and inviting them into a world of reading and writing through expressive language.

I would love to hear your ideas. How will you celebrate poetry with your learners and use it to invite them in to reading and writing?

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